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THINKING THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY

THE PHOTOBOOK ISSUE

Source Magazine: Thinking Through Photography - Issue 88

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The winter 2016 issue of Source is all about Photobooks. What is the greatest ever photobook? We have conducted an international poll to discover the answer to this question, asking photographers, publishers, critics, booksellers, collectors and others to nominate their favourite books of all time. You can see additional analysis in the magazine but here are the results including the comments and selections of every nominator.

The 150 Greatest Photobooks of all time - see the full list here ▸

Browse Photobook Poll Results:

(indexed by voter name)

Also in the magazine we have an interview with Paul Graham about his experience of making books and his latest work. We will find out what a 'photobook' is: Jose Luis Neves asks if we can use the same word to describe monographs, cookbooks, catalogues, and artist's books or if we are actually talking about different things? Daniel Jewesbury talks to Laura El-Tantawy and Liam Magee about their contrasting types of book. Finally, we have a range of articles about books that are not normally considered part of the photobook conversation because they support causes from the Catholic Church to vegetarianism.

Film: The Photobook - Trailer

Film: Clare Strand Makes a Book with Michael Mack

In October the publisher Mack launched a new book by Clare Strand called 'Girl Plays with Snake'. This film follows the making of the book from the first production meeting between artist and publisher through the design and printing to the launch itself. What is the contribution of a publisher to making a book and what role does the artist have in the development process?

Reading Group

Still to Come: Are Photobooks for Everyone?

Or are photobooks only of interest to a niche photography readership? To test this question we gave three classics – The Americans, Ballad of Sexual Dependency and Uncommon Places – to two reading groups, one of professional women in London and the other of retired men in Belfast, and asked them to discuss the books as they would usually talk about novels. Their wide ranging responses to the books give some impression what photobooks might mean for a broader public.